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Leadership Tips

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I’m on the second floor in my home office searching for my wireless headphones. I’ve looked everywhere and was positive I left them on my desk charging. I did this so that I wouldn’t forget them when it was time for my workout. I’m already 10 minutes late for the gym, and I hate being late. “Quiana!” I scream downstairs. “Have you seen my headphones?” “Ask your sons!” My wife yells back. My response is directed at my twin teenage sons, “Boys! Have you seen my headphones?” One of my sons responds, “What headphones?” This response, of course, is my first indication that he not only knows where the headphones are but likely has them. After a couple of questions back and forth, one of my sons produces the headphones from their bedroom. “Oh, I forgot, I had them on while cutting grass.” My son responds. After a stern reminder…

Journaling is one of those tools that I wish I had known about early in my leadership journey. As a young man, the idea of journaling conjured images of teenagers with diaries hidden under their beds. Later I began to associate the act of journaling as a practice used by mental health therapists. Though both are probably accurate, I recently started to understand the benefit of journaling for leaders, specifically those looking to increase their self-awareness and emotional intelligence. Table of Contents What is journalingThe benefit of journaling How to get started journalingJournaling FAQaTop leadership journalsMy top journaling tips for leadersFinal Thoughts What is Journaling? Though I don’t think about the teenager with the diary hidden under the bed anymore, the concept of journaling isn’t that different. The act of journaling allows a person to transfer their thoughts, feelings, and experiences onto paper. Journaling is a great way to keep…

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic and having to balance home life and work simultaneously, leaders struggled to limit distractions. In 2019, Statista reported that workplace distractions involved where you worked as well as co-workers. In addition, personal distractions such as social media continue to be a deterrent when attempting to remain focused. I have a problem staying focused. So many things run through my head at any given moment that I keep a notepad at my desk to quickly jot down a thought and get back to whatever task I was working on. Even when I browse the web, I have multiple tabs open at once. As I’m typing this blog, I have a couple of screens open with Photoshop running, Chrome browser running, and OneNote as the program I use to write my drafts. So, needless to say, I understand how distractions can cause a person to get unfocused.…

Weekly team meetings are a necessary evil for most organizations, both small and large. When leaders run them correctly, they can benefit and foster consistent progress and actionable items within the organization. Unfortunately, too often, they began to fall by the waist side as time goes on. However, here are a few tips that can help you breathe life back into that dying meeting. The way a leader handles the life cycle of the weekly team meeting is similar to how many of us handle our computer life cycle. When you first buy a new computer, everything runs smoothly, just as it should. The laptop starts up lightning-fast, your files are neat and orderly, and the programs perform at their optimal levels. Initially, you try to do all the little things to maintain this high level of efficiency. You regularly empty your digital trash, you keep your files and folders…

Great leaders are usually moved up the promotion ladder rather quickly. With these promotions come the expectation that the now experienced leader is responsible for choosing their replacement. There’s only one you, and unfortunately, we can’t make copies of ourselves. Therefore we have to work with the options available and make the right choice for the organization. Here are a few tips to ensure you choose the next great leaders for the team. I’m a Warrant Officer in the U.S. Army. In most military services, warrant officers are highly respected due to their ability to strike a balance between technical expertise and leadership. As you can imagine, they make up a tiny population of our military. In the active-duty U.S. Army, we make up less than 3% of the entire service. As a result, we have an unspoken responsibility to mentor, recruit actively, and eventually choose our replacements and progress…

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